News & Features

February 16, 2018

Rzewski Makes the Political Personal

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Dog bites man is famously not news, and violinist and pianist playing Beethoven and Bartok sonatas isn’t either, but a brand-new work from Frederic Rzewski, not only co-commissioned by the Celebrity Series of Boston but tuned politically to the present—that’s news. For the Celebrity Debut Series at Longy’s Pickman Hall at 8pm on Wednesday March 7,    [continued]

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February 5, 2018

Two Orchestras and One World

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At a gala at the Boston Public Library Monday night, leadership of the Boston Symphony Orchestra declared “Leipzig Week” underway. Lectures and performances throughout the week mark a new partnership between the BSO and the Gewandhausochester Leipzig (GHO), a major German orchestra hailing from the city once home to J.S. Bach, Felix Mendelssohn, and others.    [continued]

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February 2, 2018

Hearing Leipzig in Symphony Hall

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Our BMInt colleague David Griesinger has agreed to preview a short lecture on the acoustics of Boston Symphony Hall that he will deliver during a free public symposium at the Boston Public Library Tuesday February 7th from 6 to 7 pm, part of a celebration of the collaboration between the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the    [continued]

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January 29, 2018

Leipzigers To Partner with BSO Volk

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The announcement in September 2015 that Boston Symphony Orchestra Music Director Andris Nelsons would also become the 21st Kapellmeister of the 275-year-old Leipzig Gewandhausorchester included the news of a “…strategic alliance [that] will allow Andris to consolidate the core of his European work in a place that shares a musical heritage with the BSO.” The    [continued]

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January 27, 2018

E Duo Unum

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Quite au courant, the story depicts an individual navigating a gender transition. Two singers, one male, one female, portray “Hannah Before” and “Hannah After,” both remaining onstage from start to finish. Boston Opera Collaborative’s production (running through Sunday) of Laura Kaminsky’s As One, to a libretto by Kimberly Reed and Mark Campbell opened Thursday night    [continued]

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January 24, 2018

Odyssey Opera Celebrates Sorcerer-Saint

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A 17-year-old peasant girl heard voices of Mary and God urging her to liberate the city of Orléans at the close of the Hundred Years’ War. The occupying English forces, being decidedly unamused, induced the Roman Catholic Inquisition to burn her at the stake for her heresy—in particular, for wearing pants. Since then, the eventually sainted    [continued]

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January 16, 2018

Events of 1905 Resound Theatrically

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Sergei Eisenstein’s 1925 epic photoplay The Battleship Potemkin not only advanced the nascent silent cinema art, but also served as a successful agitprop vehicle for the Bolsheviks. The opportunity to see its world shattering depiction of maggots, mutiny, and the infamous baby carriage ride down the Odessa Steps on a big screen with a live    [continued]

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January 14, 2018

Celebrating 40 Years of Democratic Musicmaking

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The inmates of the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra have been running the institution since its emergence in 1978. On January 21st, “one of the only self-governing chamber orchestras in the nation” [not to neglect the conductorless string orchestra A Far Cry], celebrates its 40th season. Music Director Emerita Gisèle Ben-Dor​ (New York Philharmonic, London Symphony),    [continued]

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January 13, 2018

Yuko Hayashi Remembered

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Yuko Hayashi, international concert artist and professor of organ at New England Conservatory, Boston, died of natural causes on January 7, 2018 under hospice care at The Residence at Salem Woods, Salem NH.  She was 88. Yuko Hayashi was born in Hiratsuka, Japan on November 2, 1929. For more than 40 years she was professor    [continued]

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January 7, 2018

Steeling the ISGM for Things To Come

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To chamber music aficionados, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s Sunday Afternoon Concert Series is the closest thing Bostonians can get to Wigmore Hall. Essential to Mrs. Gardner from the beginning of her long and generous reign, these events have continued for over 100 years as the founder would have wanted them—idiosyncratically.  As soon as her    [continued]

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January 4, 2018

Power of Tower

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To honor the trailblazing American composer Joan Tower, the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP) will champion five of her orchestral works Friday evening February 9th, 8pm at Jordan Hall. The program of nation’s premier orchestra dedicated to commissioning, performing, and recording new orchestral music celebrates, in collaboration with NEC, bassoonist Adrian Morejon and flutist Carol    [continued]

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December 18, 2017

Recalling the Passing Musical Year

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Among the BMInt staff, many writers have intact memories. Within that subset, several have submitted lists of their favorite CDs and concerts of the last season. We thank them for their reflections. Some have chosen to nominate concerts they have reviewed while others have chosen from concerts which they merely attended. Another wants to plump    [continued]

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December 12, 2017

AMOC Inaugurates a Festival

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Friday night marks the beginning of  American Modern Opera Company’s (AMOC) first festival, Run AMOC!, which will “redefine opera through its new model of interdisciplinary collaboration.” Held entirely in Harvard Square neighborhood from December 15th-18th, Run AMOC! partners with the American Repertory Theater to throw out the old standards of opera performance and attempts to    [continued]

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December 9, 2017

Nobel Committee Honors Amy Beach

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In Amy Beach’s richly eventful 150th-anniversary year, another notable honor will very soon take place, during the Nobel Prize awards. The Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Joana Carneiro, will be performing second movement, Alla Siciliana of Amy Beach’s “Gaelic” Symphony in E Minor, Op. 32 (Women’s Philharmonic Advocacy Publications’ revised edition) for the Nobel Prize Awards Ceremony on    [continued]

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December 5, 2017

Holiday Opera CD Suggestions

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This past year an unusually large number of fascinating and rarely performed operas have been released, mostly for the first time ever, on CD. With the holiday season in view, BMInt has asked me to share some of my delighted discoveries from this flood of new arrivals, as well as my (rather lengthy and detailed!) reviews of    [continued]

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November 16, 2017

Tanglewood Is Icumen in

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The coming Tanglewood season is full of the usual suspects, regulars, and warhorses, but more than anything else it is organized around the centenary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth. The number of performances, events, and celebrations for Lenny is large, and if the abundance seems overemphasized, we should remember that Bernstein gave his heart and soul    [continued]

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November 15, 2017

Concerto To Crown Celebration

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Amy Beach’s monumental Piano Concerto shows her at the height of her powers as both composer and pianist. This weekend  Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra will perform it with Randall Hodgkinson soloist and Neal Hampton conducting, at Houghton Chapel Wellesley on Saturday at 7:30 and at Slosberg Recital Hall, Brandeis on Sunday at 7:00.  Forty-five minutes before each    [continued]

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November 13, 2017

Shiffman Begins Imprint on Rockport

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Barry Shiffman makes his Rockport debut as artistic director/performer next Sunday, when he take to the stage with the Ying Quartet and Zuill Bailey for a juicy program ending with Brahms’s String Sextet No. 2, one of the more engagingly chewy works in the chamber repertory. I’ve never heard a bad performance, and with the    [continued]

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November 10, 2017

Beach Breaks Through in 1892

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The Grand Mass in E-flat Major, Op. 5,  put Amy Beach on the map, “among the foremost rank of American composers,” as one critic wrote after the premiere of the 1890 work, by the Handel and Haydn Society two years later. So why has it not entered the repertoire? That Beach was American and female    [continued]

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November 9, 2017

Singing for Nearly a Millennium

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Thomanerchor (St. Thomas Choir) Leipzig was established in 1212—over 800 years ago—and centuries after its founding was led by J.S. Bach, from 1723 until his death, in 1750. During those years they premiered numerous works by the master. A major institution in Germany, the choir operates its own school just a stone’s throw from the    [continued]

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November 8, 2017

BU School of Music in the Ascension

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The distinguished British conductor/composer Bramwell Tovey became Boston University Director of Orchestral Activities in September, several months after the retirement of David Hoose, who led the program from 1987 to 2015. Readers can evaluate the wisdom of the appointment on November 13th at 8:00 at Symphony Hall, when Tovey leads the BU Symphony Orchestra in    [continued]

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November 2, 2017

Taking a Knee in 1918

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Neil Swidey’s report in the on-line Boston Globe Magazine [HERE] recognizing the centenary of the persecution and imprisonment of Dr. Karl Muck, peerless music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra between 1906 and 1918, is thorough and rich in detail, making for fascinating as well as discouraging reading; it’s by far the best treatment of    [continued]

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October 31, 2017

Götz, Grand Harmonie, and the Viola d’Amore

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Celebrating his recent discovery in the Czech Musical Instrument Museum in Prague, soloist and historian Paul Miller will join Maureen Murchie in the world premiere of a concerto for two violas d’amore by Franz Götz (1755–1815). Also including a pair of galant pieces from brothers Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and Johann Christian Bach, this program    [continued]

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October 25, 2017

Don’t Tread on the Liberty Tree

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Citizens of the young American colony sang their rejection of tyranny in partsongs, marches, anthems, jigs, and ballads; the rousing works by citizen-composers such as Boston tanner William Billings and Vermont tavern-keeper Jeremiah Ingalls still ring true today. With the Choral Fellows of Harvard University (Ed Jones, Director) and young professionals from the Longy School    [continued]

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October 19, 2017

Hearing the Feelings of Refugees

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In “Music in Migration,” A Far Cry explores music emblematic of human migration: Telemann’s musical “world’s fair” Overture “Les Nations” in B-flat major for Strings and Basso continuo, the debut of the first piano concerto by Elena Ruehr depicting soloist Heng-Jin Park’s own immigration story, and Symphony No. 10 for Strings, by Mieczyslaw Weinberg, an exile    [continued]

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